RULES OF ENGAGEMENT



A nutrition education program grabs kids’ attention to get them to eat more veggies.
Kids often are reluctant to try new foods, especially if the new foods are vegetables. Whether our nation’s ever-growing appe­tite for sugary or fatty foods or the fear of the unknown fuels that resistance, one thing is clear: Vegetables have an image problem among kids, and TV advertising often is to blame. 
 
RULES OF ENGAGEMENT A nutrition education program grabs kids’ attention to get them to eat more veggies.  Kids often are reluctant to try new foods, especially if the new foods are vegetables. Whether our nation’s ever-growing appe­tite for sugary or fatty foods or the fear of the unknown fuels that resistance, one thing is clear: Vegetables have an image problem among kids, and TV advertising often is to blame.


Sugary, high-fat foods frequently are marketed to children, and judging by the number of ads regularly shown on TV, those marketing efforts work. A March 2007 report by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that, on average, kids aged 2 to 7