What’s the simplest way to cut 400 calories a day?

Beyond the obvious (like stepping away from the cheesecake), start by nixing liquid calories, says Lauren Slayton, R.D., owner of Foodtrainers in New York City. She’s not talking about
just soda and cocktails:
Even healthy beverages can jack up your calorie count. Cases in point: pressed fruit and vegetable juice (up to 440 calories for 16 ounces) and coconut water (up to 93 calories for 16 ounces).
 Then make a few smart swaps throughout the day: Replace a slice of cheese with an extra handful of spinach to cut 100 calories from your omelet. Instead of a quarter cup of almonds, snack on one ounce of kale chips— up to 105 calories, saved. Dress your salad with lemon
Beyond the obvious (like stepping away from the cheesecake), start by nixing liquid calories, says Lauren Slayton, R.D., owner of Foodtrainers in New York City. She’s not talking about just soda and cocktails: Even healthy beverages can jack up your calorie count. Cases in point: pressed fruit and vegetable juice (up to 440 calories for 16 ounces) and coconut water (up to 93 calories for 16 ounces).  Then make a few smart swaps throughout the day: Replace a slice of cheese with an extra handful of spinach to cut 100 calories from your omelet. Instead of a quarter cup of almonds, snack on one ounce of kale chips— up to 105 calories, saved. Dress your salad with lemon
juice rather than balsamic vinaigrette and you can cut about 77 calories per ounce. For more ideas, go to calorie-cutting-tricks.
 What kind of routine can I do with a jump rope?—Carly, Tampa, FL
Don’t worry—you don’t need the coordination for double Dutch to torch mega calories. This circuit, created by Ron Mathews, owner of Reebok CrossFit Lab in Los Angeles, will burn about 200 cals in just 20 minutes! That’s because jumping rope helps rev your metabolism, work your whole body (especially those calves and hamstrings), and amp up your reflexes. Do each exercise for one minute, moving from one to the next without resting.
Complete all seven exercises, then rest for two minutes. Repeat the circuit as many times
as you can. Mathews’s coreengaging tip: Keep your hips even and use your wrists (not your hands) to twirl the rope.
1. Singles: Jump rope with two feet.
2. One-foot alternating singles: Hop from foot to foot.
3. Multiples: Do two left-foot single jumps, then two right. To make it harder, increase the number on each foot before alternating.
4. Wide-outs: Start with your feet together, then spread them wide on every other jump. Increase the difficulty by crossing your feet when you jump in.
5. Cross-country skiers: Jump forward with one foot and back with the other, then switch.
6. High knees: Lift one knee toward your chest, then the other.
7. Butt kickers: Kick one heel toward your butt, then the other.

 I’ve been hearing a lot about krill oil. Is it different from other fish-oil supplements?
—Cortney, San Diego, CA The major difference?
Krill oil usually contains astaxanthin, a powerful antioxidant, says integrative physician Frank Lipman, M.D., founding director of Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in New York City.
That said, fish oil packs a higher dose of omega-3 fatty acids, which can boost heart health and may even improve your immune system and mood. Some experts say the omega-3s in krill oil— though at a lower dose— might be better absorbed by your body, but Lipman
still recommends fish oil. “Krill oil has a lot of potential, but we have way more research on fish oil,” he says.
Though fans rave that krill supplements don’t have a fishy aftertaste or cause fish burps, downing your fish oil with food or taking a burpless formula should solve those problems. The bottom line: Whether you stick with fish oil or switch to krill, taking an omega-3

supplement in some form is not only smart, says Lipman, but also important for optimal health.
all Fitness___Elle, Milwaukee, WI

0 comments:

Post a Comment